ANALYSIS: Does DEFAMED Auteur Jason Deeh Pitre’s “Zwebel Army” Song Glorify HITLER?

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    MONTREAL, QC: As the countdown reaches 36 hours before the launch of the new Jason Deeh Pitre’s miniseries DEFAMED: The People Vs. Jasouche Douchon on DNN On Air, many unanswered questions and accusations continue to swirl among a segment of its assured “stealth audience”.  This faction’s leader, the morbidly obese unemployed toy collector, sugar daddy, trademark infringer, and king of trolling fails from Ringoes, NJ, Meatball “Mayor” John Mazza, deserves credit for the genesis of the entire DEFAMED project as he had been the one to launch slanderous and defamatory accusations at Deeh Pitre in an ambush that marked a turning point in the sputtering Spreecast program Kermit and Friends.

    John Mazza [file photo]
    John Mazza [file photo]
    Mazza’s assault essentially attempted to accomplish two goals: to prove that Deeh Pitre was the true identity of former Kermit and Friends contributor and DNN mogul Douche! the Monkey and to then publicly humiliate him and discredit him.  Despite the fact that Mazza has failed to produce one single shred of evidence beyond minor coincidence and creative misinterpretation, he has doggedly stuck to his guns.  Deeh Pitre’s name has been dragged through the muck and mire of Mazza’s demented fantasy world for weeks, with Mazza intoning the same dreary rhetoric every time.  Kermit and Friends official lapdog, Gaia Paia, even suggested Jason should be flattered by the attention, in one notably crazed ‘officially sanctioned’ rant.

     

    Marc Zweben
    Marc Zweben

    One of the great bombshell exhibitions Mazza will gladly repeat to anyone who isn’t bored yet is the famous and widely popular “Zwebel Oath” song (often referred to by fans as the “Zwebel Army” song), which Deeh Pitre created at the time Marc Zweben was promoting his Zwebel Oath in May 2015. The Zwebel Oath was a clumsily-worded pledge to cover all other Zwebel Army members’ backs in the event that they were trolled or bullied. While Zweben charmed many viewers with his recitation of the oath at first, the oath eventually became something of a weapon and tool to delineate “us” and “them” boundaries between those who took the pledge and those who refused.  Deeper thinkers in the audience were amused by the unwittingly fascist overtones the regime on the program was taking on.

    The Zwebel Oath was eventually taken, voluntarily or under coercion, by nearly every principal on the show in May and early June.  Notable holdouts were Honest Frank, Eytan Mirsky, and Corey Beffert.  A couple of chat room users even recited it, although most of the chat scorned and ridiculed the very notion of it.  While it was not quite clear from whom it was intended to protect, Zwebel Army members were known to have an antagonistic relationship with Vashier and his then-popular Google Hangout, which was a hotbed of criticism of Kermit and Friends and its principal members, which at the time garnered over 250 live viewers a day, seven days a week.  Among chat users on rare occasions at Vashier’s hangout was one Twiggy, a name readers may recognize in altered form as Twiggylu, the name of DNN’s production company.  The phrase “kick me, fake cripple” was born there.

    Jason Deeh Pitre
    Jason Deeh Pitre

    Jason Deeh Pitre was also a fairly active Kermit and Friends contributor at the time, and his contributions were growing in ambition.  One of his greatest and most inspired creations was his spoof of the Zwebel Oath, in which the subtle fascist overtones displayed on Kermit and Friends were made overt.  The song uses a verbatim reading of the Zwebel Oath as its lyrics, and is set to a march sung by Deeh Pitre, who multi-tracked his voice to give the illusion of multiple marchers singing in unison. The music was sampled from Laibach’s mock fascist cover of Opus’ “Life is Life”. It was perhaps one of the greatest clips never shown on the program (it made its debut only during DNN’s Year in Review series), and remains a much-requested video hit.

    As a refresher, here it is in its entirety.

    Triumph of the Will (1935)
    Triumph of the Will (1935)

    The video takes clips from three sources. The first segment is from Triumph of the Will, the socially reviled but cinematically acclaimed 1935 Nazi propaganda film by influential filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl.  Triumph of the Will retains its standing among filmmakers because of Riefenstahl’s stunning and advanced cinematography, which utilized numerous innovations (later put to even greater effect in Riefenstahl’s Olympia) to achieve its desired effect of capturing in enormous glory the images of thousands moving in perfect unison and the sheer enormity of the crowds. The sequences are stunning and memorable, and are frequently emulated in movies to this day. Triumph of the Will is a fairly obvious touchstone if one wants to create a visual image of fascism that is visceral and immediate.

    Apple Superbowl Ad (1984)
    Apple Superbowl Ad (1984)

    The second segment is taken from Apple Computers’ famous 1984 Superbowl ad, the first-ever advertisement for the McIntosh.  This advertisement was based on George Orwell’s dystopian novel 1984, in which a fascist regime ordered its citizens to view incendiary images in hate sessions directed at a vague enemy.  It is widely interpreted that the evil regime in Apple’s ad was intended to represent IBM, and the ad was intended to promote Apple as its creative, freedom-loving alternative.  It has frequently and widely been used as a touchstone in pop culture, referenced in many media. Deeh Pitre superimposed the smiling mug of Marc over Big Brother’s image on the video screen.

    The third segment consists of World War II footage of shelling and bombing, which completes the general idea of where fascism usually leads.  In the context of Deeh Pitre’s video, it works well in maintaining the general ambiance the first two clips provide and it helps to highlight the absurdity of the lyrics, which are provided in subtitles.  The verse ends with a note “and so on” in the subtitles, and the clip ends.

    Opening credits
    Opening credits

    The genius of the clip is in its concept and execution; it aptly conveys what was funny about the Zwebel Oath in the first place, it astutely gets across the deeper analogy, and it is a funny audio/visual gag.  It is that part that the notoriously unfunny Mazza fails to see; the clip is a bit of absurdist comedy, which succeeded in making its audience laugh.  The real work went into the recording of the song; the clips were the first choices anyone would make if they wanted to capture “that fascist feeling” without putting too much effort into it. However, the actual editing was probably a chore, and the combination of audio and video works perfectly. It hit a home run with the audience at the time, and continues to do so whenever it is shown.

    It should also be noted that at no point are Adolf Hitler, swastikas, or war atrocities presented in the video at all.  The video is about fascism, not Hitler.

    Marc Zweben with G. Gordon Liddy, from infamous Twiggy tweet
    Marc Zweben with G. Gordon Liddy, from infamous Twiggy tweet

    Meanwhile, Mazza noticed a gag tweet made by the roguish Twiggy, which included a photograph that depicted Marc Zweben with G. Gordon Liddy. Both the well-known Zwebel Army leader and the famous right-wing radio host and Watergate burglar were adorned with Hitler mustaches.  The slow-witted Mazza drew the connection that the Zwebel Oath song and the Marc/Liddy Hitler mustaches could only have been posted by the same person. Clearly, the similarities between the two are manifest: they both have Marc in them.  They don’t both have Hitler in them, but such subtleties are lost on the increasingly-obsessed magic trick broker from New Jersey, who continues to slander Deeh Pitre every chance he gets for the perceived sins committed by the monkey leader of the DNN Hate Crew.

    The best course of action for Meatball Mazza and anyone else caught up in the delusions of the troller without a cause (but would like the story presented in a more entertaining manner than a typical Mazza dronefest) would be to tune in to DNN On Air in 36 hours.  At 8PM EDT on Friday, April 1st, DEFAMED: The People Vs. Jasouche Douchon will present the drama as it should be told.

     

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